Big Foot Art Site, Cania Gorge: Site Report

Authors

  • Catherine Westcott Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072
  • Ian Lilley Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072
  • Sean Ulm Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072
  • Chris Clarkson Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072
  • Deborah Brian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.25120/qar.11.1999.86

Abstract

This site report presents a description of archaeological investigations undertaken at Big Foot Art Site, a large rockshelter and art site located at Cania Gorge, eastern Central Queensland. Field and laboratory methods are outlined and results presented. Excavation revealed evidence for occupation spanning from before 7,700 cal BP to at least 300 cal BP, with a significant peak in stone artefact discard between c.4,200-3,200 cal BP. Results are compared to analyses undertaken in the adjacent Central Queensland Highlands.

Author Biography

Sean Ulm, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072

Sean is a Lecturer in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies at the University of Queensland. Sean specialises in the coastal archaeology of Queensland, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, and his work has been published widely both in Australia and overseas. His current research focuses on southeast Queensland, the Gulf of Carpentaria and Torres Strait. Sean is currently Editor of Australian Archaeology and on the Council of the World Archaeological Congress. He is a past national President of the Australian Archaeological Association Inc.

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Published

1999-12-01

Issue

Section

Articles